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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  November 26, 2013 3:00am-6:01am PST

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. great caption contest. the pope and putin. lowell. i use this to cover my bald spot. and richard. greetings prime minister. we should to be done by easter. "morning joe" starts right now. >> we got a big deal, nuclear deal with iran. they made some kind of an agreement. they will give up their enrichment program but something is not right at the white house.
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did you see the president? i think it's the wear and tear of the president. the president is announcing the anything nuclear agreement with iran. something is not right. >> diplomacy opened up a new path for the world. a future in which we can verify that iran's nuclear program -- >> he has a giant cat there. okay, good morning. that's ridiculous. >> i don't understand why did he have the cat behind him. >> we're still trying to figure out why miley did it. so they went with it. today is november 26th. is it going to be christmas soon? it's happening. >> thursday. >> thanksgiving first. >> i'm hearing christmas music in the store. i almost fainted the. mike barnacle is here. >> mike is in a strange mood today. what's wrong mike?
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>> nothing is wrong. i'm getting set for christmas. >> we also have white house correspondent julie pace here in the studio. are we doing this first? okay. tomorrow is the busiest travel days of the year. >> t. j. wants us to. >> judging by the weather forecast it could be one of the nastiest as well. big storm system is picking up speed and heading for the northeast coming right our way. for millions of people that will be heading out on the highways and airports, pack your patience. it means trouble. let's go to bill karins. bill, there are millions of people that are right now trying to figure out their weekend plans. i actually had to fly andrew up early from pensacola because of the storm he had to miss a day
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or two of school. it will affect millions and millions of people. >> tomorrow we're watching freezing rain. the huge storm is still located in louisiana. it has to go up through new england by tomorrow night when everybody is hitting the roads. as far as the airports go today the greatest concerns they have, the largest delays expected atlanta through the morning and afternoon, charlotte pretty much all day long, raleigh during the afternoon and evening and late today d.c. and baltimore areas will break out in rain. minor problems there. same with pittsburgh. tomorrow, the airports, washington, d.c. early in the morning. but you'll actually improve rapidly during the day tomorrow. this time tomorrow morning from new york city the worst from philly to new york early tomorrow from 5:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. then improving. boston, hartford, dealing with
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high winds and torrential rain early tomorrow and may last into the afternoon. pittsburgh will be snow same with buffalo. here's how it looks today. green is the rain moving up the coast. white is the snow on the back side. as we get into wednesday, this is tomorrow morning at 10:00 a.m. high winds in southern new england, maybe enough to do damage with power outages and damaged trees. back side is snow. if you're traveling wednesday areas of western pennsylvania, ohio, western new york state enough snow to be of concern five to eight inches possible. so, joe, the bottom line is for new england arraignments the big hubs the worst will be early wednesday morning improving wednesday afternoon but it may be too late for a lot of people. >> what are you doing on thanksgiving, bill? >> i'm here. i'm working. >> me too. >> i'm going straight into the heart of that storm, buffalo, new york. >> buffalo! >> keep your fingers crossed.
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>> you a buffalo girl in >> i am. >> that's fantastic. you staying in boston? >> i'm staying here. >> your really? you'll be working. >> willie? >> i'll be here working. >> i will too. >> and friday too. >> no, you won't. >> i don't like taking time off. >> it's disorienting to you. >> yeah. where am i. >> this is so much the identity. this is where i get my meaning in life, right here. sitting in the chair. >> are you mocking? >> all i'll say is chris lake i was renegotiating my contract which i do every three days around here. i'm renegotiating my contract. and another thing i need more vacation time. they don't give me enough.
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then i say how much vacation time we tripled that last year. >> seems like i fill in four. >> i feel really badly. >> i know you do. >> did you see katie couric is going to yahoo!. >> she's a news anchor. >> this is the move. >> this is the move. >> i've been trying. the google boys buy the show for $80 billion or something,ing right? >> yes. >> this is the future. >> what yahoo! is doing, at some point television and internet are going to be completely one and the same. >> yeah. >> she's going to be the face of yahoo!. she's going to do high-profile interviews on the front page of the site as well as cover major news stories. it is, i think, a real step into
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the future of television. >> this is what it takes. i was thinking back because i'm always concocting these -- cold fusion experiment, it's coming to fruition. >> it will work. >> by the end of next week, old school. real cold fusion. not a scam. when i think about these new models how do we leap from where we are to the future auth simple question. it's content. what would i pay money to see. and it usually hits me that, you know, when he was alive i would have paid -- if tim russert left nbc and gone to yahoo! or google or whatever, i would have gotten a subscription. i would have paid them 10 a month or 15 a month. that's what it's going to require. once you get the talent like that moving over there, transition will be pretty quick. >> content is king. it's going to be even larger going forward. when you talk to people who know
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a lot about this and certainly not me they will tell you anybody who says here's what everything will look like in five years they don't know what they are talking about. >> nobody does. >> but it's going to be based on the web. >> it is. >> such a reflection how people consume news not any more you have a show at 11:00 and everybody tunes in for it. people want to go on the internet and watch your clip or show at any time of day or night. >> they have other things going on. >> you talk about this show. it's so fascinating. phil understood this when he was setting up the website. i'm sure you guys see this wherever you go. i'll be traveling across the world. and somebody will say i watch your show every day. jeffrey sachs says that. he goes to subsaraha africa and
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people will come up i watch "morning joe." how do you that? we have those big 15 minute chunks everybody watches the show. so this show -- it's got people watching but the vast majority see these 15 minute clips and they see them across the world. you told that fascinating egypt story when you went to egypt -- >> the morning show in egypt. comes on in the afternoon. the way they get their news about the united states. >> can we do this in the united states? >> they are watching the news for show. >> i was going to say, that's a smart move by katie. melissa mayer gets it. she understands where everything is going. msnbc.com has done that too, hiring great reporters. hiring them away from some old media companies, putting them all in one place and creating a
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big entity. >> we have a big announcement coming up on this show, a good example of hiring somebody from a big traditional media outlet that will come and work just here across all platforms. >> all right. >> i didn't know pee-wee herman. he's good but i didn't know he did news. he was framed. we'll prove that on this show. you know, people go, anthony weiner, no internet. no, you still wouldn't have been mayor. it's the pee-wee herman rule. >> to we want to talk a little bit about what we're going to do. the retrial, pee-wee right here? >> i got to talk to phil first. >> it is ten minutes past the hour. >> so we're just -- you know it's the holidays. we'll do some more downer news. the president is in trouble.
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i didn't know that. what a shock. >> we'll put that aside. >> a new cnn research opinion poll shows trouble for president obama. on a number of issues the president is under water. >> you're doing a great job. >> 53% say the president is not honest and trustworthy. that's a 24-point swing from may. 53% say he's untrustworthy. 60% say he doesn't know how to manage the government effectively. that's a 25-point net swing from a few months ago. being strong and decisive, 26% say president obama has those characteristics. 56% say he doesn't inspire confidence. but it's not all doom and gloom. i'm bored. >> do we want to do hecklers? we've done it 50 million times. rehashed and contrived. do you want to do hecklers on immigration reform?
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>> no. why should we. i do want to talk about these numbers. people, julie, get upset when you say, you know, compare where the president is now where george w. bush is with katrina because they are not intelligent. they think you are trying to compare hurricane katrina and that shameful response on all levels of government with president obama stumbling on obama care. no. we're just talking about the president's standing. i want seems to me you do cross the rubicon at some point. these numbers are devastating. i don't see how he turns it around easily. >> there's a big difference between having your job approval rating fall and then having your honesty, credibility, trustworthiness ratings fall because those are the factors that keep the public with you even if they disagree on policy, they let you get your job approval back up. when those factors start to fall it's hard to bring them back up,
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hard to bring your job approval back up. the worrying thing for the white house is what do you do? is there a policy that you can start implementing? immigration is not going anywhere. where do you turn? >> iran. >> iran. but if iran is your big success or what you're really holding out for then you're at a weird place. >> can i ask you a question and be careful how you answer it. it's not a leading question. i don't want to put you in a difficult position. around the set a lot of people were saying and around the world, diplomats were telling me what donny deutsch was saying that this deal was the sign of a desperate white house that needed to get some points up on the board. can i ask you around the pool that follows the president, were there raised eye browse? was there skepticism he was pushing a deal to distract from what was going on at home? >> i don't think there was a skepticism to get away from health care or other issues but
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it was clear that a deal is something that the president really wanted. this is something he has wanted for several years now. he really is -- >> the iran deal specifically. >> the iran deal specifically. if you remember back to the 2008 campaign, remember back to his first inaugural address, this was something he made clear. he was willing to talk to iran. his outreach to iran went far deeper than what people knew. involved a lot of secret talks. this is something he wants. whether he did it to distract from health care, people will take a stand on that. i'll back away from that question. >> i've always said if you flip iran and they become our, you know, i won't say our friend but something other than our adversary you change the map not only for the middle east but the world. there's not a single country that would be more strategically important to have on our side
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than iran. but it is a -- boy he's swinging for the fence with a 3-2 count. like it's a dangerous political move. >> don't know it was a 3-2 count. i would not be unwilling to bet that the poll numbers that we just saw would take a bit of a reversal within six weeks. if the health care stuff works, but the iranian stuff has been going on for months if not years. so the idea that he did this in order to get people's eyeballs off the health care thing that's kind of preposterous. it's been in the works for months if not years. front page story in the times, president obama places emphasis on diplomacy. who among us would not prefer diplomacy than continuing military action around the world. i rather talk than fight. >> completely agree. >> the critics say it's the kind of diplomacy and the way you
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approach. >> diplomacy is messy, it's never perfect and eventually you have to start talking to people who you don't like decent agree with otherwise -- >> it's not overnight. >> it's a very slow process. it never goes the way we think it's going to go. >> i'm glad we're talking to iran. i don't think we have to come to these six month deals but we'll see. we had this debate throughout the 1980s. ronald reagan was going to start world war iii when he refused to sit down with the soviets and eventually after taking enough of a tough line the soviets moved his way. >> a couple of stories here. two of them about the mental health crisis in this country and another is a fascinating conversation about parental responsibility which i hope we get to. first long awaited report on the massacre at sandy hook elementary school reveals no motive for why 20-year-old adam lanza shot and killed 27 people
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but it paints a disturbing portrait of a young man whose life revolved around three things, video games, guns and a fascination with mass shootings. the report carefully details his life at home. in his bedroom windows covered with black trash bags. he let no one in even with his mother whom he communicated through e-mail. he constantly played video games. they include "call of duty," "grand theft auto" and at that role playing game called "school shooting." witnesses said he would often lock himself in his room and play individual crow games all day. his father told investigate skrors his son was bullied extensively when he was young and the report says as he grew older his ability to handle life and school deteriorated and he increasingly became a loner. police found photos with a gun
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to his head. there were blog postings about mass shooting. he was particularly interested in the 1999 massacre at columbine high school and it's perpetrators and yet despite all this investigators say there was no single emotional event that led to his carefully planned assault on the school. the report also reveals that lanza had five different firearms that december day including two hand guns and a semiautomatic rifle and shotgun. his mother had apparently written him a check for christmas to buy another handgun. this diagram shows the incredible amount of ammunition he had at the school alone, 301 rounds, 147 live, 154 used. that's one story on mental health. we'll put it over there. now to virginia. state senator creigh deeds blame
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officials for his son killing himself and stabbing him. his son was released after the community services board could not find a space to keep him. 13 hours later gus deeds attacked his politician father. before taking his own life. deeds said, the father in an interview with a local reporter, i cry a lot. i can't focus now or talk to anyone. i have very strong opinions about the community services board and feel like they are responsible. my life's work now is to make sure other families don't have to go through what we are living. multiple nearby hospitals said they had capacity to accommodate gus deeds. the state's inspector general is inspecting why deeds' son was released and the governor has order ad probe as well. >> mental health, mike.
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mental health. we talked about it after newtown. you look at what happened to creigh deeds. >> looking for help. >> not having a bed to keep his son in. having to bring him back home. >> looking for help. >> apparently, there was a bed for the younger deeds. but the adam lanza story is so shocking on so many different levels. this was clearly an affluent family in an affluent neighborhood with hopefully i would think access to some mental health assistance and yet none was asked for, therefore, none was received. in a home where the boy was clearly that unstable and it was known that he was that unstable, to be in a home with access to that many guns. >> and the mother wrote him a check to buy another gun. >> to buy another gun for
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christmas. it's an astounding story. you know, you hesitate to point fingers at the dead, obviously. the woman is dead. >> i don't think there's anything you can do at this point. but ask why that was allowed. and why she would -- you know why she would buy another gun. buy another gun for a boy those of disturbed and locked inside of his room all day. first of all, as a parent who allows your child to stay locked inside their room all day. you don't do it. >> a parent doesn't know what to do. >> you pull them out. >> yeah, but. okay. >> for parents that are listening. your kids stay locked up in the room all day and play violent video games. guess what? bad things are going to happen. they are going to
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desensitized. it materially impacts them every bit as much to allow your child to sit in his room all day long to view pornography for 20 hours a day. it will twist and warp his view of basic human relationships of women, of men, of sex, of love, of everything and it's the same thing with these violent video games and, you know, it's beyond me, willie. it's not like i grew up in a convent. i've seen a lot of these games. i've played a lot of these games. everything in moderation. people defend the most violent of video games and say oh, i play. it doesn't make me jump off a cliff. >> or for those who say it's art. >> you're not locked up in a room all day. this is shockingly bad negligent parenting.
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just shocking. >> the conclusion of the report is that there is no motive. maybe that's true in the criminal sense. but take a look at this report. the pictures are not graphic. you can go look at them. it's apparent what's wrong here. you have a mentally ill child who stayed inside a room all day, watched violent video games, had access to weapons of mass destruction because that's what his guns became on that day. you put that together. again as we said at the time of the shooting it's not just one game it's not just violent video games or mental health or gun but all these things together and cost 26 lives, 20 of them first graders. >> all of us as parents are at some level delusional about a child, your children. you think they are greater than they are and you want them to be greater than they are but at some level reality has to sit in and clearly reality never sit in within this household. >> locking inside at that room
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and communicating by e-mail. >> school community too. there's a lot of different breakdowns here that we don't know enough about. in terms of mental health parents need help. >> you do wonder if this report brings this debate about gun safety, mental health back into the forefront and was a huge conversation after the shooting. it's been under the radar. >> well, the thing is we're coming up just coming up on the one year anniversary on december the 14th. so this thanksgiving, this holiday season, if you are somebody that pray, pray for the families in newtown. not only -- >> faith, family, children who suffer from mental health. >> not only over thanksgiving but the whole vacation. i talked to an official involved
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in newtown and they said we can't wait for december 15th. >> yeah. >> the day after the anniversary. they just want to get past the 14th. they are praying that they get there without too much pain. >> okay. other news to get. we'll get back to detroit this morning. that's going nice. the stipulate's incoming mayor mike duggan joins us along with rick snyder and lloyd blankfein. we're going live to detroit. >> is lloyd coming in here? >> he's in detroit. >> he's in detroit. >> we set the whole thing up. very exciting. >> you know, we could really, maybe we could ask him. >> he's been unresponsive to my emails. >> keep sending them to him.
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>> said he'll keep it on file. >> what do you need from lloyd? . it a job. i want to be the man. i want people to hate me. i want to work for goldman sachs. willie and i want gold plated like jets. they fly those. >> up next the morning papers and the top stories in "the politico" playbook. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. i started part-time, now i'm a manager.n. my employer matches my charitable giving. really. i get bonuses even working part-time. where i work, over 400 people are promoted every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart.
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i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. yep. got all the cozies. [ grandma ] with new fedex one rate, i could fill a box and ship it for one flat rate. so i knit until it was full. you'd be crazy not to. is that nana? [ male announcer ] fedex one rate. simple, flat rate shipping with the reliability of fedex. with 0-calorie monk fruit in the raw. it's made with the natural, vine-ripened sweetness of fruit, so you can serve up deliciously sweet treats without all the sugar. raw natural sweetness, raw natural success.
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did you try restarting it? no, not that. i was thinking about getting a tablet as a gift... verizon has tablets. they got a lot of them? accessing brain information... yes, they have a lot to choose from. did you really just... and now you can get $100 off any tablet. thanks, wayne. save like never before on any tablet at verizon now. get $100 off any tablet. plus trade in your old tablet for up to $150 or more. that's powerful. verizon. can you move your beverage away from the keyboard? it's making me anxious. sure thing. ♪ 29 past the hour. let's take a look at the morning papers. omaha world herald a new report detailing a secret cia program used after 9/11 to hunt down
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terrorists. the associated press reports the spy agency used the facility to turn prisoners into double agents to kill members of al qaeda. they were promised freedom, safety for their family and million of dollars from the secret cia bank account. cia lost track of some of the prisoners once they went back home. the program ended around 2006. telegraph yesterday, pope francis welcomed russian president vladimir putin to the vatican. the two men met in the pope's private library for 35 minutes where they discussed the crisis in syria and other issues. a centuries-old rift between eastern and western churches was not discussed. walmart is getting a new president and ceo. the board of directors elected
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doug mcmillon to take over. they can contribute for the funds being put together for victims in bangladesh. nice. wonderful. good news. >> they are not paying their employees? >> not enough. >> they work there for free? >> just about. >> "usa today" delta and u.s. airways are helping thanksgiving travellers avoid bad weather by waiving change fees. passengers traveling today and tomorrow can change their flights without penalty. delta's waiver covers 12 airports along the east coast from boston to d.c. u.s. airways policy covers three dozen cities. >> you know what i'm going to do? go to laguardia. get on a plane and just sit there. you know there's nothing i love more than a pilot coming down --
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>> hold on. they put you on the plane. they roll out to the runway. this has happened five times. bringing carlisle home. five times in a row. put you on the plane. go out to the runway. shut down the engine. well we're going to be sitting here for a while. take off time is in 45 to 50 minutes. we'll keep you posted. they keep you hostage. they get you in there and then give you the bad news. my favorite. a couple of months ago, i almost passed out with rage and lewis and mika and i were flying down to washington for some event. i got to say, you fly long enough, and i've flown so much over the past 25 years. you know when stuff is going to happen. i'm sitting there, you can feel it before you get there. this flight is not going to take off. i look at my little radar thing. it's not going to take off. we get on the plane and i said,
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please, don't take us out there and stop us and have us sit on the runway for four hours. oh, no it's going to take off. so we get out on the plane and i'm saying the whole time we're not taking off. why are you doing this. you pull away from the gate and as we pull away from the gate and start to taxi, the captain comes on. you guys picked a bad night to fly. his words exactly. you guys picked a night to fly. we're going to shut down the engines right here. i swear to god we weren't 30 seconds from the gate when he said that and sat on the runway for four hours. >> is shuttle is not the shuttle because it takes four hours. >> i could jog down to washington. >> do the joe biden method. take amtrak. >> one of the best elements is when they shut the engines down and say we have a ground hold at
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the airport you're going to. we'll keep you posted and you sit and sit and they say okay, we're cleared to take off but we need a crew change because we've had this crew on this plane -- >> tag out. >> oh, my lord. >> it's ridiculous. you want to do politico? >> let's go the president and ceo of politico and capital new york. good morning, jim. >> how are you? >> so, jim you got this piece up on the site about the white house's approach now to selling the health care law. it's becoming now a local issue. i guess they sort of accepted the fact that coverage from the national press is not going to be helpful to them. >> right. there's no knowns and no unknowns in this debate and the big unknown how does this play out in the next three or four months. what the president told his staff there's no chance we'll
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get good coverage from national press. what they are doing they are taking the president and his top staff and looking at the biggest markets that have the most uninsured and making sure there's an official talking to the media in those areas, in those states, in those districts almost every single day and they are focused on those states where republican governors did not accept the additional funding for medicaid. over time they think they have a much better chance to move the needle at a local level than talking to folks on national cable or to folks in washington. if you look at the results this often does work. they get much better coverage. you look at the local papers, the headlines are better, the quotes that they are getting from white house officials are better than the national coverage which has been horrific for the white house. for people who think the press loves barack obama, i would advise you take a look at the analysis being done by almost every single major newspaper over the last month. they have been devastating for the white house. >> julie, how frustrated is the
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press with people like you and others who cover that the success stories haven't gotten out in the way that the negative has? >> they are frustrated but it's not as though we're making up these problems wholesale. these are legitimate problems. this strategy of going around the national press and is going to local press is something the obama team has elm employed for a long time. they feel if they talk to people in their communities, and talk to them through their local newspapers and forums like that it's a better chance much getting their message out than talking to folks like me. >> they should talk to folks like you. >> welcome the president. >> just regular kids. >> jim, thanks so much. >> coming up, rg3. looking to bring back last season's magic touch on monday night football. doesn't look like it will happen this year for the skins. the niners and washington next on "morning joe". [ male announcer ] at northrop grumman,
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all right. time for some sports. monday night football in d.c. niners visiting washington. rg3, colin kaepernick facing off. kaepernick got it done last night, three touchdown passes including a couple to bolden. rg3 managing 127 yards, sacked four times. the redskins did not score a touchdown last night. san francisco wins in a blow-out 27-6. washington has now dropped three consecutive games. a lot of frustration down there. i'm telling you watching that game, he gets hit on every play. he drops the ball and runs. gets hit in the leg and in the head. a short career. >> he's nowhere mother as mobile as he was. >> he's just not going to make it. let's go the nba. terrible news for the best players in the league. derrick rose will miss the rest of this season after undergoing
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surgery to repair a torn minisucs in his knee. the former league mvp was hurt on friday night. two openings for rose one could have seen the 25-year-old back on the court in a couple of weeks. the bulls decided to go with the more cautious long term approach. that's a terrible story. i have a friend who works for the bulls and they are just despondent in chicago. >> he's a quality guy. >> really great guy and great player. >> the new york mets coming off soot disappointing season but that's not keeping their crack pr department from working overtime this season. to get fans in the holiday spirit. ♪ just hear those holiday bells jingling ♪ ♪ it's lovely weather for a sleigh ride with you ♪ ♪ outside snow is falling and folks are calling yoo-hoo ♪
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>> no. no. >> t.j., you're a mets fans right? >> yes. >> this is good. i like this. >> maybe it's ironic. >> it is. they are having fun. >> there's also false advertising. matt harvey will not be appearing. >> i got a feeling that 2014 will be the mets season. >> i think it is. >> was that serious? >> don't think there's any doubt it will be their season 2014. >> great ballpark. >> great ballpark. >> great family. >> you got to love them. >> it's true. >> all right. >> all coming together this year, mike. you will laugh. you know what? i get my "sports illustrated" out at the beginning of the year. they predicted sox would finish in fifth place. >> wrap it up. a few things to talk about here. >> last spring. same thing for the mets.
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>> willie, what's next? >> coming up next dean of the columbia law school, david schizer joins us for the must read opinion pages. avo: the volkswagen "sign then drive" sales event is back. which means it's never been easier to get a new passat, awarded j.d. power's most appealing midsize car, two years in a row. and right now you can drive one home for practically just your signature.
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so, i went with a windows phone. maybe i just see things other people don't. ♪ honestly ♪ i wanna see you be brave ♪ ♪ 47 past the hour. live look at the white house. lights are on but the sun has yet to come up. the dean of the columbia through fiscal david schizer. good to see you. our must invade from the daily beast. presidents can never seem to learn to stop overreaching by stewart stevens. our political life seems to have a recurrent pattern that, perhaps, not surprisingly mirrors so much of our nonpolitical life. we invest our faith in politicians who seem to under the world better than we do, only to be disappointed.
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we don't seem to learn. but then neither do the politicians. again and again we see presidents overreaching on a key mission of their presidency resulting in the opposite of their desired effect. barack obama has elected with a pledge to bend history's arc and restore faith in government. by overreaching on health care he has managed to achieve precisely the opposite effect. those who were previously among his most are a dent supporters have been especially disillusioned by the reality of obama care. the one standard of obama's presidency a believe in his personal honesty has plummeted. >> don't we see this as a recurring theme in history, bill clinton gets elected in '92 as a new democrat, he goes too far left, republicans win in '94, they are too far right, bill clinton is elected in '96, same thing with bush in '04, nancy
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pelosi in '06 and this cycle with president obama. it does prove, does it not americans are far more pragmatic than ideological when choosing presidents. >> clearly true. it's hard to think of a second term that's gone well for a president in the last few decades. people just stumble one way or another and president obama is having a rough ride right now. >> he really is. he's having a tough time leading making strong choices. one area where he seems to be going back and forth has to do with keystone. we have an energy revolution coming up and some concerns, i see andrew cuomo right now in new york state doing pretty well against opponents here's an energy revolution in new york state that's not going to happen as long as andrew cuomo is governor. this is about fracking. is he making a right choice. >> who would have thought ten years ago we would have this amazing energy revolution in the
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united states. pennsylvania, north dakota, texas is benefiting. new york is not in it at the moment. my own view is with careful regulation this is something we could do and should do. >> how overblown are the warnings about fracking? is it dangerous? >> think you have to do it carefully. toxic chemicals need to be dealt with carefully. but it stems me that can to be done. >> do you think president obama taking a step back from new york state, his approach to energy, we don't hear about it a lot, overshadowed by some of the other things talked about on a day-to-day basis. during his 5 1/2, six years, america has undergone this revolution, weaned itself off middle east oil. has his approach been the right one? >> we're importing very little oil. it's remarkable. >> isn't it amazing. >> who would have expected it. >> it happened so quickly. >> a million barrels a day,
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increasing production in 2012 alone. quite astonishing. the federal government hasn't been involved in doing this. they have been involved in stepping back and letting the states regulate. at the same time the president has claimed some credit for it and he does have a wonderful secretary of energy who is an expert. >> how did this happen? i know harold hamm created technology, revolutionized us so much. are we going to look back 10, 15, 20 years when we're exporting more oil than everybody else and we have this natural gas revolution, we'll look at a guy like harold hamm and say that guy changed america's energy outlook? >> it does seem like the private-sector has done this and they have taken technologies that existed before. they combined them, persevered, created and the results are quite incredible. >> do you see one that, when you look at the marketplace that has an advantage over the others and
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something people can use practically in their lives. >> we have to hope that over the years these technologies will really catch fire, take hold. certainly wind is approaching viability, but it's not something that we can rely on too heavily for a number of years. >> with fossil fuel, with an explosion and discovery of fossil fuels, the very thing that was driving research and alternative energy sources has gone away. because bottom line is oil or gas or those traditional fuels, they are just going to be cheaper. they are going to be easier. they are going to be easier to transport. everything. right? so the good news is, obviously, that we're having this energy revolution. the bad news is for people that believe intern energy sources, there's just not a viable economic model that really invest in those areas, are there? >> not in the near term although
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i expect we'll keep working on those source. if you look a few decades down i would be surprised if we're still using fossil fuels as heavily as we are now. >> david schizer so great to see you again. thank you for being on the show. >> willie and i if we don't get hired by blankfein at goldman sachs we may go to law school again. >> oh, my god. still ahead on "morning joe" -- can you imagine the two of you. we'll go live to detroit for an exclusive interview with goldman sachs ceo lloyd blankfein. warren buffett and michigan governor rick snyder. "morning joe" back in a moment. [ male announcer ] if you stash tissues
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wow. look at this assembly of talent here. >> gary, john and meacham. tina brown. gets no bigger. "morning joe" coming right back. .
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ask your gardener about poop. poop. it's the [ bleep ] [ laughter ] >> what was that? >> t.j. we have kids watching this show. >> look at our panel. what was that? >> what are you doing. >> dog owners. you have dogs. >> i don't want to see that. >> i'm a dog owner. i don't want to see that. >> that was gross. >> dew point to see it? >> no. >> i was disgusted by it. >> welcome back to "morning joe." we're sorry about that. >> a shame. >> joining us now former mccain senior campaign strategist and msnbc political analyst steve schmidt. editor of the daily least, tina brown and historian john meacham is here. >> a new research poll has troubling signs for president obama as more persons are showing decreasing confidence in his ability to lead.
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on a number of issues the president is under water. 53% say the president is not honest and trustworthy. that's a 24-point swing from may. 60% say he can't manage the government effectively. on being strong and subsidize, only 46% say president obama has those characteristics. 56% say he doesn't inspire confidence. all right. 60% still believe he has a vision for the country's future, and 71% say the president is likeable. >> tina, though, minus 24 on honest and trustworthy. >> that's pretty brutal. >> that's brutal. how does the president push immigration reform other other issues. >> it is ironic on the diplomatic front we're seeing this great momentum and i want may will be legacy wise that's thing he's remembered for and that this awful botched, you know, health care roll out will
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be something that's transient. what we're seeing with the iran diplomacy and now seeing with talks with syria and so on, we are maybe going to be seeing a president who found a way to manage the absolutely, you know, reforming map of the world in a way that, you know, was actually quite nuanced and quite smart. >> steve schmidt, if you have a candidate that is an elected politician that's minus 24 over six months on honest and trustworthy you got a serious problem. what do you do? >> very serious problem. they are devastating problems. the harsh reality is when you see a decline that rapid that fast you lost control of your own political destiny. >> steve, is it the promise you can keep your health care? like what makes numbers tumble like this? >> clearly it's the promise, if you want to keep your health care you can keep it. and it's going to go down in political history as one of the great political broken promises
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in recent american political history. and it has had a devastating political effect and certainly an effect on any immigration debate. the president's credibility to go out and talk about that there's a bill that will secure the border, of course, has been shattered by this. that's an important part of managing that republican constituency. >> is it an overreach that this promise the president made has caused the bleeding much like george h.w. bush was hurt by his broken promise on taxes? >> well, obviously there's a rough analogy there. we've been to this movie before with the last three two term presidents. with reagan, with clinton and with george w. bush. we've reached a point about now where the domestic scene was falling apart and something like -- something like foreign policy held out some hope. with clinton it was camp david. bush the post-2006 surge and
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dealing with north korea and other things. i think it is the -- i think it's the incompetence of the roll out plus the sense that a lot of people have he said something that wasn't true. i have a feeling that's more about, the trustworthiness is more applicable than honest. i don't think people think that he has somehow or another in a corrupted way not told them the truth. but what i resist the analogy on bush 41 is that president bush made a conscious decision to break that promise. >> right. >> because he thought it was for the greater good of the country. president obama made a conscious bid to break that promise because he shouldn't have made it in the first place. it wasn't applicable. >> there's evidence he knew he was going to break his promise while he was making that promise according to some of the reporting back at the time that he, you know, was running around telling people. people suggested he nuanced a
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bit and then decided no we'll keep it stripped down and clean like this when as far as back as 2010 they had studies and findings that showed it wasn't going to be. >> look it terrifies people. there's nothing more personal, more intimate than your health care and people have great anxiety about this. the ear aspect of this poll you look at the trust in government, the capacity of government to do things. this is devastating for a democratic president. one of the ways that you judge the success of a democratic president that's expanded the size and scope of the government is its ability to confidently solve problems that you laid out with urgency that it's government's role to address. that project has seen great decline. >> it is a fearful thing that the person in charge is a bungler. what i'm told is that they did know this was going to be something that wasn't going true but that the language wasn't refreshed, in a sense obama is
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going out with unrefreshed language that hasn't updated the reality behind-the-scenes. you go argue he should have known better but you could argue he's been very poorly served. >> very poorly served. >> that's the question. john, historically, can you name a president in modern history that went below that 40% threshold to this degree that lost this much support, to get it back. >> they got it back. >> george w. bush didn't. harry truman dived down to 22%. at some point you reach the point of no return. >> the closest example, i would bet that president reagan dipped in november '86, almost exactly this time -- >> 8,000 years ago. >> 8,000 years ago. iran/contra broke this month right about now. '87 was miserable. you had the hearings, oliver
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north. howard baker came in and they were thinking about invoke the 25th amendment. total chaos. he left on a pretty good high note largely because of the soviet union and what was going on there. that happened. that goes to tina's point. there can be a foreign policy victory. president reagan never had this issue on the domestic front. no. these things are hard to turnaround. >> it's much more like the katrina debacle in a sense for bush in terms are of vivid dramadram dramatization. the president was calling on house republicans to take action supporters in the crowd urged him to use his executive powers to stop deportations. take a look at this.
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>> most importantly we'll live up -- most importantly we will live up to our character as a nation -- >> our families are separated. there are thousands -- >> that's exactly what we're talking about. >> every single day. >> that's why we're here. >> mr. president, please use your executive order to halt deportations for all 11.5 million undocumented immigrants in this country right now. we agree we need to pass immigration reform at the same time you have a power to stop the deportation. >> actually i don't. that's why we're here. >> need your help. >> okay. >> stop deportation! stop deportation! >> what i would like to do -- don't worry about it, guys. okay. let me finish. how about -- these guys don't need to go. let me finish. no, no, you can stay there. hold on a second.
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>> if, in fact, i could solve all these problems without passing laws in congress, then i would do so. but we're also a nation of laws that's part of our tradition. and so the easy way out is to try to yell and pretend like i can do something but point be as easy as just shouting it requires us lobbying and getting it done. >> steve, actually the president has a great deal of authority and latitude on how aggressively the united states government deports people every day, right? >> he does. and there's been record levels of deportations. but as you move through this period now where you're trying to put together a deal and there's a possibility still that an immigration deal could to be done, but to see young people screaming at the president of the united states who are, in fact, in the country illegally, i just can't think of -- as someone who supported immigration reform for at that long time i can't think of worst optics for people who are in the
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middle on the fence on this issue. so, you know, to those activists doing that all over the country to members of congress, to the president rudely they are setting back their cause in ways they can't imagine. >> why is that? >> because at the end of the day the people who are yelling in that instance are, in fact, in the country illegally. and so if we're going to -- i did read that this morning. you have a number of these activists out around the country who are in the country illegally, interrupting, protesting, screaming in a way that i don't think is particularly constructive as you're trying to persuade people who i think legitimately have concerns about the federal government's ability to control the border. to know who is in the country. to bring this issue to a final resolution that requires a compromise. to allow the people to stay in the country who are here
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illegally, to regularize them, to put them ultimately on a path where they can obtain citizenship and it requires a commitment by the federal government to deal with this historically and not been able to do which is to secure the border once and for all. >> you believe immigration reform should pass. >> absolutely. >> a pathway to citizenship? >> absolutely. we have 11 million people in this country here illegally. we have to deal with the people here illegally. what we have now is a de facto amnesty. people don't have an entitlement to be in the country illegally. >> okay. but if they are, you're against amnesty. >> i'm certainly against waiving it off and saying it's okay. there has to be a path offered. you have to deal with the fact that people who are in the country eulogily whether they pay a fine, as they move through citizenship, courses, classes, whatever that remedy ultimately looks like certainly there will
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have to be steps included. >> the notion this could be kicked down the line is unbearable. two out of three americans want immigration reforms. if the republicans don't embrace it they are done. >> we have some other stories to cover. have the daily beast been covering this story. >> this morning -- >> i have an update. there are new charges in connection to the rape of a 16-year-old girl in steubenville, ohio. in march high school football players were convicted of raping of the victim at an alcohol fueled party. pictures of the incident spread like wildfire on social media. the case drew national attention on focus whether the students athletes accused of the crime were being protected by officials of the school. yesterday four school employees including two coaches and an elementary school principal were indicted. school superintendent michael mcveigh is facing the most
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serious charges including tampering with evidence and obstruction of justice. the state's attorney general said the indictments send a clear message. >> it is up to the adults. it is up to the adults to intervene. it is up to the adults to change things. it is up to the adults to set boundaries. it is up to the adults to teach the kids right from wrong. >> mika, this sound like an awful example of adults letting children down especially the young girl that was raped. >> letting everybody down because the teenagers involved deserved consequences and i know that's hard for parents and school officials to, who have football teams or whatever that get their school's attention. >> it's incredible institutions always wind up trying to protect their institutions. it happens again and again in whatever country. there's a major case in india where a very, very aggressive
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investigative magazine which was leading the rape coverage in india, the editor who i was with a couple of weeks ago have been accused of raping a young staffer and what happens even though this is a whole culture which is again it, you know, it ends up defending and it's extraordinary how that happens every time. >> in this case there was pictures and there's video of boys bragging. i mean, it is as bad as it gets. and the fact that any school official or any parent wouldn't want to just actually, you know -- i don't know. it's very hard as parents to admit that your kids do bad things but when they do, you kind of have to address it. >> particularly when the social media kicks in. >> yeah. so this will go on. we thought it ended with just the two convictions but now we're looking at adults being held responsible for the actions of teens. and that will open up a whole
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new conversation. >> let's move on to afghanistan. >> afghan president karzai is now more reluctant than ever to accept u.s. troops in his country beyond 2014. >> the guy begs us to stay. then we say we're going to stay and now he says he doesn't want us to stay. the second we tell him we're not going to stay he'll start begging us to stay. >> he met with susan rice to discuss the proposed deal. karzai issued a set of new conditions that made any agreement seem unlikely. his spokesman said the afghan government is looking for a pledge to end all u.s. raids on afghan homes. for washington to send all afghan detainees at gitmo back to afghanistan april and for u.s. officials not to endorse any candidates at next year's afghan elections. white house officials say that without an agreement by the end of the year military officials will have no choice but to operate as if all coalition troops will be withdrawn from
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the country. >> well, i mean it sounds like he has finally gone over to the taliban. he said he could be on the taliban side -- he said we can't raid taliban safe houses. he's saying he wants us to release afghan citizens who can be terrorists in gitmo back to afghanistan. that's no deal. i say we leave tomorrow. >> absolutely. of course -- >> we should have left in 2009. >> the afghan government introduced this weak legislation to reintroduce stoeng thning. >> just shot two people who were accused of adultery because they didn't get to stone them. that's literally where they are at right now. >> if this is status queue, we need to examine it, the fortunate maybe secretary kerry
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somebody needs do a whole case study. we need a pentagon paper. >> we were talking about this on set in real-time in 2009, talking about tripling the number of troops. we couldn't find anybody on set that thought it was a good idea. richard holbrooke came and pretended to think it was a good idea. and other administration officials pretended to think it was a good idea. everybody knew it was a stupid thing to do. john u-said when this tops becoming an anti-terror campaign which bush did and started to become an anti-insurgency campaign, all was lost in afghanistan. and we're just spinning our wheels. >> listen, at least we're getting out now but at the same time we're leaving behind that's going to regress very fast and the taliban are on the rampage right now, murdering people. there was a poignant piece in the "time" magazine of those refugees trying to get to christmas island. they are dying in these boats
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rather than staying there. >> how do things change whether we leave in 2013, 2014 or 2034. they are called the taliban now. they are called something else 20, 30 years ago. they were called something else when alexander the great was there. >> we have no ability time pose a decent society on the afghans. karzai is corrupt and anti-american and it's not worth a further drop of american blood, it's not even worth american splinter. it's time for us to get out of afghanistan. we lack a vision for why americans should be there. it's time to bring this war to a close. >> steve schmidt thank you, tina brown as well, meacham. >> you're going nowhere. >> fast. >> up next, rebuilding detroit one job at a time. how michigan's governor is teaming up with the biggest names on wall street to put the motor city back to work. plus an update on that big
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♪ the goldman sachs 10,000 small businesses program designed to help small businesses thrive and impact entire city economies is headed to motown. today detroit success added to the cities across the country that are participating in the program. joining us now from detroit the chairman and ceo of goldman sachs lloyd blankfein. chairman and ceo of berkshire hathaway warren buffett. co-owner of sweet potato sensations, s.b. thomas who was selected for early admission to the program, and also the republican governor of michigan, rick snyder. we should note goldman is a
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partial sponsor of our show today. lloyd, i want to start with you. we were with you for new york, new orleans, chicago and then new york again. this concept is spreading across the country. tell us about this partnership with detroit now. >> this is our 17th city. we'rology out th-- we're rollin this program. it's a mini mba program. we teach skills, provide mentorship, we provide structure, we go through business planning. we provide in many cases capital for their businesses, important things we're selecting people who have already engaged in business and need a little bit of a help to get over the hump in order to grow their businesses and make more revenue and hire more people. >> governor, i would love to ask you because right now detroit is in such a period of transition. there's also a great deal of need there. how does this program fit into
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some of the plans in detroit to bring the city back from the situation it's in now? >> i really appreciate goldman sachs bringing this program to detroit because it can make a real difference. the good part is there's at that lot of economic come back going on in detroit. it's very exciting from an investment point of view in terms of creating jobs, but having more small businesses is critical. that's where jobs come from in terms of many cases for economic growth. i'm very excited to see it come here. >> warren buffett, i know how this program works. how will it apply in detroit and can you introduce us to your early admission prospect, who i guess has jumped in early and is capitalizing on the opportunity which is fantastic. >> yeah. she should be teaching, actually. this woman knows how to run a business. everybody can learn. and with michael porter's help,
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a great curriculum has been developed. we work with community colleges in the local areas, and 99% of the people who start the course follow through with it. six months later when we check about their businesses they've'ed people. some people learn about business in the home like die. others don't. on negotiations could be invaluable to somebody who really hasn't thought about that subject much before. we have a lot of courses like that and i can tell you they are working. >> mike barnacle. >> sweet tot to sensations. >> i want one. >> your company. tell us how you're growing that company in an environment like detroit which is formidable. how are you doing it? >> yes. well sweet potato sensations is heaven on earth. everything is made from sweet potatoes. we're just trying to make beautiful things happen in
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detroit. >> you know, i want to put a question to governor snyder because let's separate small business from detroit for a second here. we've been to detroit many times and the other side of it is demand. and you don't have demand these businesses cannot succeed. so, supporting the business is one thing but what's being done specifically to get people to buy these products? >> well, there's great opportunity. i mean i've been to her place. a couple of years ago i went there for pie day and it was exciting. fabulous products. i encourage everybody to buy sweet potato pies from them. in many respects the image of detroit is different than reality. most people don't realize detroit is a very thriving place. there are many great things going on, young people are moving to detroit at such a pace we ran out of housing in midtown and downtown. a program like this will only
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help neighborhoods become stronger. ate great opportunity to create jobs. people will make the drive. i made the drive a couple of years ago for the great sweet potato pie. >> lloyd or warren, how is 10,000 small businesses going to change the way she does business and what was it about her business model that made her accepted so early into the program, that made her stand out? >> well, it's the quality of the person overwhelmingly. we can help individuals learn specific skills. we can't put the fire in their belly. you have to have people that love business, that actually love customers. and then they can learn about accounting, they can learn about renting, they can learn about negotiation, a whole bunch of things. but it's like anything else, the key is in who you're working
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with. and so we work with people that have been successful on a small scale and enable them to enlarge their businesses and i think over 60% have added six months after they finish the course. >> increased their revenue. the critical spot here is -- look, there are people who can be made better who are trying to start a business. the critical spot, we're just frankly very little input can make a huge difference is people who are already in business, have a proven product, have shown they have a fire in the belly as warren describes, have a business model, has some employees osu know they know how to manage a business and just to get to that next level, teach them accounting, teach them negotiations, teach them how to work with lawyers provided legal advice in some cases and you get them over the hump, come back six months later and most of them have added people and built up revenues and by the way that provides the demand for other people's products just like other small business people and
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the people they hire will provide the demand for her product. that's the virtuous circle of an economy. >> julie? >> first i want to put in an order for some of that sweet potato ice cream. that sounds delicious. >> you got it. >> for other small business owners who haven't had the opportunity to learn from someone like mr. brittany lanla mr. buffet do you have nyad vice how to be successful? >> you have to have the drive. you definitely want it. for me my parents start this business 26 years ago. tint savvy business owner. i want to make my financial statements better. i would tell that person to keep going don't give up. >> up put in an order. i have a different approach. lloyd, can you -- i think, you know, it's a proper investment. so could you please buy me ten
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sweet potato pies by thursday? >> i will buy them four but when you get them there may only be six left. >> then make it 16. put your money where your mouth is. governor rick. >> der, lloyd blankfein, warren buffett, thank you all. we'll talk to detroit's mayor-elect in the next hour. we have to do another detroit show. can we do that. get it on the schedule. still ahead millions of travellers could be facing a tough time in the next few days. bill karins has the forecast when "morning joe" comes right back.
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♪ what's so funny? >> the song. >> live look at d.c., the sun is up. i thought you were laughing at the future. >> people are looking at wet thanksgiving with a big storm system heading east. let's go to bill karins for the
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latest. >> little bit of everything. snow, wind and some rain definitely a lot of rain too. this morning be careful. virginia, western virginia and even just west of the areas of washington, d.c., it's just cold enough for a little bit of sleet, snow and freezing rain. turn to all rain this afternoon. area of greatest concern, roanoke is at 30 degrees. you had an ice storm from asheville to roanoke. be careful on 81 and just west of baltimore and d.c. light snow across pennsylvania and new england. southern new hampshire a coating of snow on the ground including our friends in the catskills and poconos. the storm is going up the east coast. today worst of the delays will be in the south, atlanta, charlotte raleigh, significant delays especially later today when the heavier rain moves through. d.c. will have light rain during the day today. heavier stuff tonight. best chance of delays in d.c. is this evening during the overnight hours especially and then early tomorrow morning d.c. the worst will be clearing out by 4:00 a.m. new york city the worst will be
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clearing out by 10:00 a.m. tomorrow. boston, hartford, providence, linger a little bit longer. all day wind event with periods of heavy rain especially in boston. possibly significant delays there in logan. traveling in new england could be one of the worst spots. the cold side of this storm, we're going get snow starting late today. picks up in intensity tonight. heaviest snow from pittsburgh, buffalo, rochester, erie, binghampton. cleveland you're on the edge important,ly about three inches for you. anyone driving there late tonight early tomorrow morning will be the worst of it and lake-effect snow machine will kick off as we go throughout thanksgiving day. i think the bottom line is you got about 36 hours and then it begins to clear out wednesday night. >> all right. bill karins thank you. do you think you ought to head home? >> first of all, i'm going out and buy a copy of "planes, trains and automobiles." >> you should head home.
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the new issue of "fast company" reveals the secrets of the world's most product jeff people. editor is here with the article of "the art of doing everything." we'll be right back.
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okay, who helps you focus on your recovery? yo, yo, yo. aflac. wow. [ under his breath ] that was horrible. pays you cash when you're sick or hurt? [ japanese accent ] aflac. love it. [ under his breath ] hate it. helps you focus on getting back to normal? [ as a southern belle ] aflac. [ as a cowboy ] aflac. [ sassily ] aflac. uh huh. [ under his breath ] i am so fired. you're on in 5, duck. [ male announcer ] when you're sick or hurt, aflac pays you cash. find out more at aflac.com. ♪ welcome back to "morning joe." here with us now editor of "fast company." it delves into the secrets of the world's most productive people. i would expect a lot of women are on that list. >> productivity is one of the
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big challenges in our world. there's so much information coming at us all the time. >> you look at the different approaches from some of these people. first of all, how do you decide who is the most productive. it is money? >> productivity is about getting things done that are valuable. right? we can spend a lot of time doing and working and working lots of hours. that doesn't mean we're being effective with that time. that's what we're trying to identify with productivity. >> so let's go down the list of the people that you featured. most of them get up really early to start their day. there is the importance of getting a head start, obviously. i learned that a long time ago. >> there are thousands of apps that are out there to help you be more productive. there are 5,000 books on productivity that's come out in the last three years. a lot of confusion about what can be effective in making us productive. one of the big challenges is that there's so much information, we all have this yfd fear missing out.
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information is coming out -- which emails do you look at, which ones you do not look at. we don't believe there's a one size fits all but you have to find the kind of person you are and create a strategy for yourself that works. >> let's go down the list. you have musician and music producer farrell williams. >> he's a media mogul. he's a songwriter. he helps other people. he's a philanthropist. he has a jewelry business. he does a lot of interesting things. he does get up early but he says sometimes the most productive time of the day is not to be giving away too much but in the shower. he's the light his morning meetings because he's there essentially meditating trying to decide what he'll do, being clear to have some day away from the tunnel so when he engages he can be effective. these are the challenges.
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there's a woman, wendy clark from coca-cola, a marketing executive. she has a regime where she spends her time on her way to work planning her day. at the end of the day she exercises and that's when she's reviewing what she got done and could do next. the challenge is what we do for each of us differently. so if you are a procrastinator, checking your e-mail first and is an easy task is just going to delay you. that for some people getting the e-mail done and feeling like you've had some progress helps your productivity move forward for the day. i got something done. for other people it becomes a distraction. you have to find for yourself the terms and conditions so that you -- >> so tory birch says be quick with emails. >> there are some people, one of the founders of red doesn't like
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calling people on the phone. it's a waste of time. i'm imposing myself on home to have a phone call. even if works in the office he rather text with them. feels it's more efficient. >> you said that these scenarios don't work for everybody but is there a strand that links productive people together. we mentioned getting up early. is there anything else that's a common theme. >> at that lot success mindful and being able to step back from the noise. recognizing who you are. being mindful about it and going forward. there's an author who comes out with two or three books a year the. and yet he is a multitasker. he's working on multiple books all the time and he doesn't say oh, i have to get a certain number of word written for a day. if one project isn't moving well he goes to next one. that works for him. for other folks, he has to focus on one thing. osu have to recognize yourself and create a strategy that works
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for you as opposed to trying time pose somebody else's strategy on your life. >> think it's a good morning with cops get mentioned. >> didn't come out of your mouth. >> i know. this is great. thank you for coming in. talking about e-mail, back when mail came in, memos came in there was a certain amount of control you had about when you dealt with something. is there any research or reporting that people make better or worse decisions because everything comes in at the same level with e-mail and text? it all comes in. you can be anywhere, not in the shower presumably, but are better decisions made because you can make them instantaneously or worse or now >> e-mail can become a trap. it was at first a terrific productivity enhancer for all of us, all of the information we could deal with that way. it does become a trap now that
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we get caught and feel like as you say, someone sends us a message and we feel obliged to respond to it whether it's a loved one, a boss or someone spamming us. they come in at the same level. there are more apps that allow to you filter that so it makes it a clearer hierarchy for you. running your life according to your earn mail is not a productive way to run your life. >> what do we do with these people with all these tools who confuse motion with achievement. >> that's what that challenge is again to step back and say what are the things i'm doing are having value. this is -- at "fast company" we're trying to encourage our readers and business people and people around the country to recognize, put your work towards things that are going to be productive. >> same thing for moms who are working at home raising kids. it's very hard to feel you're being productive because it's a long game building children into
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adulthood. you got to look at the value of what you're doing. it doesn't make any money and more important than anything we're talking about here. the new issue of "fast company" out now. thank osu much. on tomorrow's show our conversation with oscar winner dame judi dench. up next lewis hits the red carpet with u2. you're watching "morning joe." helicopthierhis hibuzzing, andk engine humming. sfx: birds chirping sfx: birds chirping thnot at the rings.looking. i can feel them looking at my thick, flaky red skin. do i tell them it's psoriasis? do i speak up and say it's not contagious?
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it was a bad weekend. they saw their playoff hopes diminished yesterday, lost to the rams. that didn't stop them from having fun. two guys outside a bar called the emerald isle in chicago. somebody challenged somebody to a race. there's a lot of talk about football players getting brain damage. we might need to start worrying about football fans, too. >> yeah, you're there. >> ready, set, go! >> oh! what? >> [ bleep ]! [ bleep ]! >> wait, why are those guys hugging? >> because it was a beautiful
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moment. >> it was beautiful. >> i guess. to them. wow. last night the legendary band u2 hosted a special screening for the new film "mandela: long walk to freedom." their song, "ordinary love," which was inspired by the former south african president, is featured in the movie and our own louis bergdorf was on the red carpet and spoke to the band about its involvement with the film. >> i'm on the red carpet at the sigg field theater in new york for the u2 premiere of "mandela." >> every morning joe rants about leadership. go see "mandela. "this was a guy who was a leader, who kicked butt. >> my name is nelson mandela. >> we had this movie screened for general powell, hillary clinton, and mccain at the same time. this is what joe talks about every morning, republicans, democrats getting together. >> your decision to cast -- >> yes, i take full
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responsibility. >> i think the biggest challenge is trying to portray him as a real man. you know? we've all got an image of him being this saintly figure and he's almost like a saint that lives in the clouds, but he's a real human being and it was important that i brought that to life. >> what was really challenging was that, you know, seething rage and hatred and i personally never try to hate anybody or anything. so to kind of go to his dark places, his emotional places you don't normally like to go to, that was really difficult. >> what was it like for u-2? >> a dream. the fact they connected with it, all four of them, they loved the movie and were inspired to write something for movie means such a lot. >> what inspired all of you guys to write that song? >> just a sense of not wanting to screw up because we are -- we're not african and we're irish, so to be asked to be in it is already a big deal. but we just didn't want to blow it. we wanted to write one of our
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best songs and i think we have. >> what they've been able to do is tie it together in a way that makes it an emotional, engaging narrative and you still get to understand the magnitude of the achievements of nelson mandela. >> i spent a night in a cell close to his cell. it was the worst thing i've probably gone through. i left in the morning with a lot of apger about the sort of -- this injustice that happened and it helped me really determine my focus. >> he's fantastic in this movie. you have to see the muci after this. >> i'm going to see it. >> put this thing down and go to it. >> i want to see it. >> yeah. absolutely. >> all right. good job, louis. up next, going inside the armstrong lie. the director of the producer behind the lance armstrong documentary and the doping scandal that brought down an
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wanted to be here for your fist christmas? you see grandma lives waaaay down here, and you live way up here. brian, your cousin, he's a little bit older than you, he lives here, in chicago. and your aunt lisa lives here, in baltimore. uncle earnie? waaay out in hawaii. but don't you worry, we will always be together for christmas. [ male announcer ] being together is the best part of the holidays and cheerios is happy to be part of the family. you just ate dallas! ♪ by the end of december, we'll be delivering ♪ ♪ through 12 blizzards blowing ♪ 8 front yards blinding ♪ 6 snowballs flying ♪ 5 packages addressed by toddlers ♪ ♪ that's a q ♪ 4 lightning bolts ♪ 3 creepy gnomes ♪ 2 angry geese ♪ and a giant blow-up snowman ♪ that kind of freaks me out [ beep ] [ female announcer ] no one delivers the holidays like the u.s. postal service.
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priority mail flat rate is more reliable than ever. and with improved tracking up to 11 scans, you can even watch us get it there. ♪ ♪ good morning. it's 8:00 on the east coast, 5:00 a.m. on the west coast as you take a live look at new york city. back with us on set we've got mike barnicle and the ap's julie pace. let's get to bill karins who's tracking the big winter storm that could affect millions of people traveling for the
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holiday. bill? >> not even could anymore. it's definitely a will and is. the ice has already broken out in areas of virginia, especially the western portion of the state, north carolina overnight, and now even outside of d.c. we're getting reports of sleet and freezing rain to the west of town. let me show you the radar. filling in more to the north with the snow, too, in northern west virginia and around the pittsburgh area. pennsylvania turnpike won't be a fun drive over the next 24 hours. this pink color down here, 32 in roanoke, a lot of reports of freezing rain on interstate 81, so be careful there. the big cities are plenty warm enough. it will be all rain throughout the day and the overnight. the storm is located in southern louisiana. the green on the map is rain. it is pouring from tennessee all the way through alabama, now georgia being swallowed up in the rain along with our friends in florida. so far the airports no significant delays, but as the day goes on with the volume and the heavy rain, atlanta, charlotte, and raleigh are the
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three airports we could have the most significant delays and possibly cancellations late today. i think washington, d.c., and pittsburgh will do okay with lighter rain and also some snow in pittsburgh. tomorrow's the day, the most significant airport delays and the cancellations will be early tomorrow morning. the big cities, washington, d.c., especially very early with the wind, then it will improve quickly. new york city, not until about 10:00 a.m. to noon does the weather begin to improve. very high winds in the new york city area early in the morning which will cause major airport disruptions. boston it looks like pretty much into the early afternoon for you. winds could gust as high as 50 miles per hour so, that will be problematic. same for areas around providence and hartford. the snow side of the storm, the heaviest snows, the band on the backside where it will be plenty cold enough, cleveland, buffalo, syracuse, pittsburgh, rochester, elmyra, erie, charleston, west virginia, shoveling wednesday
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morning. this is tonight at 6:00 p.m. the red shows you the heavier rains, the blue the heavier snow. 6:00 p.m. worst of the driving western new york state snow, heavy rains through areas of pennsylvania. through early tomorrow morning at the commute, notice the heavier rains shift oud of d.c. and philly. they'll be located over new york state. by the time we get to say about afternoon, notice that the driving, looks like it clears out on i 95 so if you can wait to travel do so in new england until the second half of your wednesday or even into your wednesday night. joe, everyone just has a story out there about trying to get to their own locations. difficult for so many of us. >> are you driving? foo going straight into the heart of that storm, buffalo, new york. >> buffalo! >> yeah. >> fingers crossed. >> a buffalo girl. >> i am. >> that's fantastic. you staying in boston? >> i'm staying here. right on the set. >> are you really. you're working. >> turkey sandwich.
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>> willie? >> i beal here working. >>ly too. >> the holidays but more downer news. president's in trouble. really. i didn't know that. what a shock. >> we'll put that one aside. a new cnn opinion research poll has troubling signs for president obama. more americans are showing a decrease confidence in his ability to lead on a number of issues, mika, the president is under water. >> you're doing a great job. keep going. >> 53% say the president is not honest and trustworthy, a 24-point swing from may. look at those numbers. 53% say he's untrustworthy. 60% say he doesn't know how to manage the government effectively. a 25-point net swing from a few months ago. strong and decisive, only 46% say president obama has those characteristics. that's a 24-point drop from may. 56% says he doesn't inspire confidence -- >> are you bored? >> i am. >> i'm bored. >> also flipped since may. okay. i am bored.
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>> let's not even discuss it because we've done it 50 million times, rehashed and contrived. do you want dooupt to do the hecklers on immigration reform? >> no. i want to talk about these numbers. you know, people -- people, julie, get upset when you say, you know, compare where the president is now where george w. bush was with katrina. they think they're trying to compare hurricane katrina and that shameful response on all levels of government with president obama stumbling on obama care. we're just talking about the president's standing. it seems to me you do cross the ruby -- rubicon at some point. i don't see how he turns it around easily. >> there's a big difference between having your job approval rating fall and having your honesty, credibility, trustworthiness ratings fall because those are the factors
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that keep the public with you even if they disagree on policy. they let you get your job approval back up. but when those factors start to fall, it's really hard to bring them back up, hard to bring your job approval back up. the worrying thing for the white house is what do you do? is there a policy that you can start implementing? immigration's not going anywhere. where do you turn? >> iran. >> iran. but if iran is your big success or what you're really holding out for, you're sort of in a weird place in your presidency. >> can i ask you a question, and be careful how you answer it. it's not a leading question. i don't want to put you in a difficult position. around the set a lot of people -- and around the world, diplomats were telling me what donny deutsch was saying yesterday, this deal was a sign of a desperate white house that needed some points up on the board. can i ask you around the pool that follows the president, were there raised eyebrows? was there skepticism that he was
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pushing a deal to distract from what was going on at home? >> i don't think there was skepticism that he was pushing a deal in order to get away from health care or some of the other issues, but it was very clear that a deal is something that the president really wanted. this is something he has wanted for several years now. he really is staking a lot of credibility on -- the iran deal specifically, if you remember back to the 2008 campaign, if you remember back to his first inaugural address, this is something he made very clear. he was willing to talk to iran. we reported that this outreach to iran went far deeper than what people knew, involved a lot of secret talks. this is something he talks. whether or not he did it to distract from health care i think a lot of people will take a stand on that. i'm going to back away from that question. >> mike, historically swinging for the fence, i've always said if you flip iran and they become our -- you know, something -- i won't say our friend but something other than our adversary, you change the map
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not only of the middle east but of the world. there's not a single country that would be more strategically important to be on our side than iran. but it is a -- boy, he's swinging for the fence with a 3-2 count. like it's a dangerous political move. >> i don't know it's a 3-2 count. i would not be unwilling to bet that the poll numbers that we just saw would take a bit of a reversal within six weeks. i mean, if the health care stuff works, but the iranian stuch has been going on for months if not years. so the idea that he did this in order to get people's eyeballs off of the health care thing, that's kind of preposterous. it's been in the works for months if not years. and front page story in the times today, obama places an emphasis on diplomacy. who among us would not prefer diplomacy to continuing military action around the world? i want diplomacy.
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>> right. i'd rather talk than fight. right. >> i completely agree. >> the critics say it's the kind of diplomaciened and the way you approach. >> diplomacy is messy. it's never perfect. eventually you have to start talking to people who you don't like and don't agree with. otherwise -- >> and not overnight. >> not overnight. a very slow process. it never really goes the way you think it's going to go. >> i'm glad we're talking to iran. i don't think we necessarily have to come to these six-month deals but we'll see. we had this debate throughout the 1980s. >> yep. >> ronald reagan was going to start world war iii when he refused to sit down with the soviets and eventually by taking a tough enough line after reykjavik, the soviets moved more his way. >> worth playing out. >> we'll see. a couple stories here, two about the mental health crisis in this country and another is a fascinating conversation about parental responsibility, which i hope we get to. but first the long-awaited
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report on the massacre at sandy hook elementary school reveals no motive for why 20-year-old adam lanza shot and killed 27 people. but it paints a disturbing portrait of a young man whose life revolved around three things -- video games, guns, and a fascination with mass shootings. the report carefully details lanza's life at home, in his bedroom, windows covered with black trash bags. he let no one in, not even his mother, with whom he communicated through e-mail. he constantly played video games. they include call of duty, grand schefft auto, and a role-playing game called school shooting. in ninth and tenth grade, witnesses say he would often lock himself in his room and play video games all day. his father told investigators his son was bullied extensively when he was young and the report says as he grew older lanza's ability to handle life and school deteriorated and he
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increasingly became a loner. police even found photos of him with guns to his head. then there was his fascination with mass shootings. on his computers, police found blog postings about mass shootings. he made a spreadsheet of the history of mass shootings listing them by name and what happened. he was particularly interested in the 1999 massacre at columbine high school and it perpetrators dylan klebold and eric harris. yet despite all this, investigators say there was no single emotional event that led to his carefully planned assault on the school. the report also reveals that lanza had five different firearms that december day, including two handguns and a semiautomatic rifle and shotgun. his mother had apparently written him a check for christmas to buy another handgun. this diagram shows the incredible amount of ammunition he had at the school alone. 301 rounds, 147 live, 154 used.
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that's one story on mental health. we'll put it over there. and now to virginia. state senator creigh deeds is blaming health officials after his son stabbed him multiple times and later committed suicide. gus deeds was evaluated last monday, but according to the "richmond times-dispatch" was released after the community service's board could not find a space to keep him. 13 hours later, gus deeds apparently attacked his politician father, creigh deeds, before apparently taking his own life. deeds says the father in an interview with a local reporter, "i cry a lot. i can't focus now and talk to anyone. i have very strong opinions about the community services board and feel like they are responsible. my life's work now is to make sure other families don't have to go through what we are living." multiple nearby hospitals later said they had capacity to accommodate gus deeds. the state's inspector general is
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investigating why deeds' son was released and the governor has ordered a probe as well. >> mental health, mike. mental health. mental health. >> mental health. >> we talked about it after newtown. you look at what happened to creigh deeds, not -- >> looking for help. >> not having a bed to keep his son in? having to bring him back home. >> looking for help. >> well, apparently there was a bed for the younger deeds. but the adam lanza story is so shocking at so many different levels. this was clearly an affluent family in an affluent neighborhood with hopefully, i would think, access to some mental health assistance, and yet none was asked for. therefore none was received. in a home where the boy was clearly that unstable and it was known that he was that unstable,
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to be in a home with access to that many guns. >> and the mother went -- wrote him a check -- >> to buy another gun. >> to buy another gun. >> for christmas. it is an astounding story. you know, you hesitate to point fingers at the dead. obviously, the woman is dead. but i don't think there's anything you can do at this point but ask why that was allowed. and why she would -- i mean, why she would buy another gun -- >> it was easier than dealing with him. >> buy another gun for a boy that was disturbed and locked inside of his room all day? first of all, as a parent, who allows your child to stay locked inside their room all day? you don't do it. >> a parent that doesn't know what to do. >> well, you pull them out. >> yeah, but -- okay. >> no. for parents that are listening,
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no. your kids stay locked up in the room all day and play violent video games? guess what, bad things are going to happen. they're going to become desensitized. they may not go and shoot up a lot of young kids but -- >> their life is going in the wrong direction. >> it materially impacts them every bit as much as allowing your child to sit in his room all day and view pornography for 20 hours a day. it will twist and warp his view of basic human relationships, of women, of men, of sex, of love, of everything. and it is the same thing with these violent video game ls. and, you know, it's just beyond me, willie. not like i grew up in a convent. i've seen a lot of these games. i've played a lot of these games. everything in moderation. there's always people that defend the most violent of video games say, i play and it doesn't make me jump off a cliff. yeah. >> or those who say it's art.
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>> you're not locked up in a room all day. this is shockingly bad, negligent parenting. just shocking. >> the conclusion of the report was that there is no motive. maybe that's true in the criminal sense. but take a look at this report. the pictures are not graphic. you can go in and look at them. and it's apparent what's wrong here. you have a mentally ill child who stayed inside a room all day, watched violent video games, had access to weapons of mass destruction, because that's what his guns became on that day. so you put that together, and again, as we said at the time of the shooting, it's not just one thing. it's not just violent video games or just mental health or just guns, but in this case all those things came together and cost 26 lives, 20 of them first-graders. >> all of us as parents are at some level delusion nal about a child, your children. you think they're greater than they are and you want them to be greater than they are.
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but at some level reality has to set in, and clearly reality never set in within this household. >> much more still to come this hour. we're going to check in with politico's jim vandehei. plus, vladimir putin pays a visit to the vatican. did it help smooth over some long-standing tensions between russia and the catholic church?
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i started part-time, now i'm a manager.n. my employer matches my charitable giving. really. i get bonuses even working part-time. where i work, over 400 people are promoted every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart.
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let's take a look at the
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morning papers. the world herald, a new report is detailing a secret cia program used after 9/11 to hunt down terrorists. the associated press reports the spy agency used a facility at fwan tan mo guantanamo bay to turn them into double agents and send them home to kill members of al qaeda. they were promised freedom, safety for their family, and millions of dollars from a secret cia bank account. the cia reportedly lost track of some of the prisoners once they went back home. the program end around 2006. the telegraph yesterday, pope francis welcomed russian president vut on the vatican. the two men met in the pope's private library for 35 minute where is they discussed the ongoing crisis in syria and other christian issues around the world. while a centuries-old rift between western and eastern churches was not directly discu discussed, officials view it as a positive step.
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arkansas democrat gazette. walmart is getting a new president and ceo. the board of directors elected doug mcmillan to take over on february 1st. the board's chairman says, quote, the change comes at a time of strength and growth at walmart. that's great, because then they can contribute to the fund being put together for the victims in bangladesh. i'm sure he will do that. ? and pay their employees. >> that would be nice of them. >> good news. >> they're not paying their employees? >> not enough. >> people work there for free? >> minimum wage. >> just about. >> surrounded by socialists here. it's a free market, baby. i'm sorry. go ahead. >> delta and usairways are hoping thanksgiving travelers avoiding bad weather by waving change fees. passengers traveling today and tomorrow can change their flights without penalty. >> wow. >> they 12 airports from boston to d.c. >> they're so nice. >> us airways covers three dozen city. >> you know what i'm going to do because of that for the next couple days? go to laguardia, get on a plane
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and just sit there. there's nothing more thant i loe than the pilot coming on -- >> they put you on the plane. they pull up to the runway. this has happened five times. bringing carly home. five times in a row for me. they put you on the plane, they go out on the runway, they shut down the engine and they go, well, we're going to be sitting here far while. takeoff time's in about 45 to 50 minutes but we he'll keep you posted. they keep you hostage because they get you in there and then they gave you the bad news. >> my favorite was -- >> oh, my lord, on that rainy night. >> i almost -- i almost passed out with rage. and louis and mika and i were flying down to washington for some event. like i say, you know, you fly long enough -- >> yeah. >> -- and i have flown so much over, like, the past 25 years, you know when stuff is going to happen. >> lightning. >> i'm sitting there.
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you can feel it before you go there. i said this plane's never going to take off. >> too much lightning. >> i'm looking at my little radar thing. not going to take off. they go, oh, it's going to take off. we get on the plane. i said, please don't take us out there and stop us and have us sit on the runway for four hours. >> yeah. >> no, it's going to take off. so we get out on the plane and i'm saying the whole time we're not taking off. >> no way. >> why are they doing this? we pull away from the gate and as we're pulling away from the gate and start to taxi, the captain comes on and says, well, you guys picked a bad night to fly. >> what? >> his words exactly. you guys picked a bad night to fly. >> yeah. >> we're going to shut down the engines right here. >> be here for a couple hours. >> i swear to god we weren't 30 seconds from the gate when we said that and we sat on the runway four hours. >> the shuttle is not the shuttle. i'm saying it. it's not the shuttle because it takes four hours -- >> i could jog to laguardia. >> you could take the joe biden
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method, amtrak. >> happened one time too many. >> we're getting close. >> one of the best elements is when they take you out, sit on the runway, shut the engines down, we have a grand hold at the airport you're going to. >> laguardia. we'll keep you posted. you sit and sit and sit. they say okay, we've been cleared to take off but we have to have a crew change because we've had this crew in this plane too long. >> it's ridiculous. i guess we went through the papers. >> let's go to jim vandehei, the president and ceo of politico. good morning, jim. >> how are you? >> i wish he'd pay his employees. >> you have this piece up on the site about the white house's approach now to selling the health care law. it's becoming now a local issue. i guess they've sort of accepted the fact that coverage from the national press is not going to be helpful to them. >> right. there is no knowns and no
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unknowns in this debate. the big unknown is how does this play out over next three or four months. what the president's told his staff is, listen, there's no chance we're going to get good coverage from the national press. what they're doing is taking the president and his stop staff and looking at the biggest markets that have the most uninsured and making sure that there's an official talking to the media in those areas, in those states, those districts, almost every single day, and they're focused on those state where is republican governors did not accept the additional funding for medicaid. and they think that over time they have a much better chance to move the needle at a local level than they would ever have talking to folks on national cable or talking to folks in washington. and if you look at the results, this often does work for white houses, by the way, they get much better coverage. the local papers, the headlines are better, the quotes from white house officials are better than the national coverage, which has been just horrific for the white house. for all the people who think the press loves barack obama, i would advise you take a look at the analysis being done by
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almost every single major newspaper over the last month. they've been devastating for the white house. >> julia, as somebody who covers the white house every day, how frustrated is the press that the success stories haven't gotten out the way the negatives have? >> pretty frustrated but it's not like we're making up these problems wholesale. this strategy of trying to go around the national press and go to the local prelsz is something the obama team has employed for a long time, going back to both campaigns as well. they feel like if they talk to people in their communities, their local newspapers and forums like that, the better chance of getting their message out than talking to folks like me. >> he should talk to folks like you. >> i agree. >> i would. >> jim vandehei, thanks. coming up, more from motown, the huge challenges that face the city's new mayor and what he plans to do about them. he joins us next as well as brian sullivan. ♪
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welcome back to "morning joe." joining us now from detroit, the city's newly elected mayor, mike duggan, and president and ceo of the national urban league, marc
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morial, and founder of quicken loans and founder and chairman of rock ventures dan gilbert. cn cnbc's brian sullivan is here. i didn't know you were coming. >> me either. >> mayor, what's your biggest challenge? >> well, we've got to fix our city services in a hurry. e need to reduce the police response time, get streetlights on and get abandoned buildings dealt with and not just demolished. there's an awful lot of help coming and you're hearing it today from goldman sachs. dan gilbert is deeply involved with the authority. the obama administration has been in several times so i'm feeling optimistic. >> dan, knuckleball detroit, you believe in detroit before a lot of other people. >> in a big way. >> before a lot of other people focused on detroit. you're putting your money where your mouth is. tell me how possible it is to do all the things that the mayor
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wants to do over the next few years. >> well, i think the environment is really sort of cleared itself out here. i mean weather the bankruptcy that's really more of a past indicator than a leading indicator, i mean, a lot of people here knew that was going to happen far long period of time and getting through that is a great thing. having mike duggan here with his experience is going to be a great thing. downtown is hopping. so is midtown. you literally can't even find a place or apartment here. there are so many young people moving into the city. there's all kinds of entrepreneurial high-tech activity from the river to midtown. it's a very different place downtown detroit than people maybe would realize until they get here. >> it really is. i've traveled to detroit so many times in the past 30 years or so and it's changed for the worse every time. but when we went to do the show at ford, it was striking, went downtown, ate dinner with phil griffin and other people from msnbc, and we just looked at
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that downtown area, and, wow, the core of the city is pretty amazing. >> it's very vibrant and you can tell things are happening. mark, you're on the advisory council of 10,000 small businesses. we had lloyd and warren on earlier. we actually, by the way, we're going to go back in the spring. >> good. >> do a follow-up. dan gilbert, i hope you can work with us on that to work on a show that we do live there. >> absolutely. >> mark, what are you hoping 10,000 small businesses will be able to bring to the table? they have one business they're sponsoring early for detroit specifically. >> mika, this is all about job creation. and entrepreneurial growth and small business development is about producing and creating jobs. certainly for the new mayor and the partnership that's evolve lg he here in detroit, creating jobs on a sustainable basis will be the key to the future of
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detroit, which remains one of america's great cities. 10,000 small businesses has had i think an incredible amount of interest here with almost 24 businesses already who have endeavored to sign up and certainly more who will be able to sign up. and it reflects i think 10,000 small businesses, this idea of a public/private nonprofit partnership. the national urban league committed to jobs through our jobs rebuild america initiative. this works in partnership with that. and i think we're proud to make a commitment to the future of detroit. >> i think brian sullivan would probably get into the how do we pay for it type stuff, but to the mayor elect or to dan, can we get an update on the blight situation? it's something we focussed a lot on and received a lot of feedback, but give us a progress update and what's going to happen with this space once it's cleared. >> you know, there's a blight task force. i happen to be co-leader of that task force and we're knee deep into it.
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you know, there's ban lot of great efforts in the city to eradicate blight. i personally believe once blight is completely gone from detroit, which is the goal this task force has put out as its mission, within a few-year period of time, every piece of blight, whether residential, commercial, will be removed from our city. once that happens and you clear the deck with everything going on in midtown and downtown and these neighborhoods get the blight cleared out, we'll see the kind of economic revival and jobs not only created downtown but many the neighborhoods as well. we agree. blight has to go, and i know the mayor elect feels the same way. >> people are amazed to find out you can get a solid brick 2,500 square foot house in detroit for $25,000. there are a number of reasons for that, but a big part is likely there are two abandoned houses on your block and people feel the neighborhood is deteriorating. with the efforts of the blight authority, when we start to clear out the dilapidated and burned-out houses, i think
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you'll see these neighborhoods come back relatively quickly. i'm pleased dan is working so hard on this. >> i would add the cities that have faced blight in the past, of course the scale of detroit is significant, that blight is an opportunity to put people to work, to create new home owners, to spur small business growth, and there's an opportunity here with a good, strong coordinated plan to make a big difference. >> and, mr. mayor, brian sullivan. i spent time in the brightmoor second with the blight authority. they're going great work. the people we talked to there, even if they get a job have no way to be able to get it. how do you build up infrastructure to get people where they need to go even if you are successful bringing companies to the city because the city is so large and lacks a public transportation infrastructure? >> well, i think one of the reasons the voters elected me was i spent four years running the regional bus system, the smart system at a time it was going out of business and got it running well. transit is something i believe
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deeply in. we're doing a couple things. dan and other folks are work ong the rail line that will run down woodward, but we need to connect people across the city with an efficient bus system, something i know well and something i start on january 1st. >> all right. thank you all so much. >> very exciting. let me say you detroit guys, mike barnicle and i, we want to thank you for letting us win the american league championship when we really didn't have the best team. thank you for taking scherzer out before he should have been taken out. we understand that this was just our year and we understand that an extraordinary team did not advance. >> did you take prince fielder to dinner or something before the playoffs? >> just remember, we sent you tom brady. >> you did. >> michigan. >> that's right, mayor. >> congratulations, guys. this is very exciting. >> dan, you want to work with us on a spring show? >> he already said yes. >> i just want to nail it. >> sure. absolutely.
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>> okay. you know, dan, if mika asks you something twice -- >> it's going to cost you. >> duck. >> worth it for detroit. thank you. >> all right, guys. >> he cleared the calendar. >> okay. thanks a lot. still ahead -- >> is that not a great story? >> i love it. >> i love everybody coming together to fight and -- >> interesting. >> and dan really got in early. >> yeah. >> betting on detroit. because we love the place. >> coming up, oscar winning filmmaker alex gibny started off making a movie about lance armstrong's comeback five years ago. what he ended up recording was perhaps the greatest deception in sports history. alex joins us next with his new documentary tracing the collapse of cycling's biggest star. ♪ as your life and career change, fidelity is there for your personal economy, helping you readjust
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that guy was lance. that's where it becomes a game of power where you say i'm signing ferrari up for my exclusive doctor, i'm going to use a private jet to travel around, to evade detection. >> life for me at the time was moving fast. look at 2005. i had won seven tours in a row, i was engaged to a beautiful rock star. i was -- but that all just felt normal me. i certainly was very confident that i would never be caught. >> wow. that was a clip from the new
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documentary "the armstrong lie." the film was an official selection at the venice and toronto international film festivals. joining us now the film's director and producer alex giveny. thank you for coming on the show today. >> pleasure. >> so this wasn't about the lie first, right? >> no. it was supposed to be the inspirational come back story. that was the task i was set. in 2008 he was coming back, you know, out of retirement and it was going to be the feel-good comeback story. i was looking to do something a little more inspirational. >> when did you first discover it was turning into a lie? and how did you then work the change to become the product and work with him to ask him to address it? >> well, look, i had always been aware of the allegations of doping but, you know, it didn't become clear it was super real until 2010 when we virtually finished the film.
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suddenly there was a criminal investigation, a grand jury investigation out of l.a., and two of his former teammates had come toward, floyd landis and tyler hamilton on "60 minutes." suddenly the level of detail was so enormous that even as lance armstrong told me later it was too -- the lie was no longer believable. >> did you talk to him about it before? you must have. >> i started to. you know, and occasionally -- >> did he lie to you? >> he did, he lied to me straight to my face. and that's five weeks before oprah i got a call from him. and he said, look, it's all true. i doped. i lied to you. and i apologize. >> that's a hell of a phone call. >> that is a hell of a phone call. it was a jaw dropper. i mean, i had seen -- >> here's the problem with armstrong. wasn't just the lying and the deception. if you were his friend or his teammate, he didn't just say no, no, he's wrong. he tried to destroy your life. >> that's right. i think the big thing that people have -- there's two huge
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things about this story. one is that he made the lie so big. he didn't just say, look, i've never tested positive, dh might have, in fact, be true. how dare you say i as a cancer survivor would ever use performance-enhancing drugs? and two, whenever anybody tried to tell the truth, he went after them and went after them hard and that's one of the things people can't forgive. >> talk about the structure that was around lance armstrong, the structure that he built around himself to protect himself and the fact that clearly eventually it led to him absolutely believing the lie that he was living. >> well, i think part of the thing was that his story was so power pfl. i mean, the cancer survivor story was so power pfl. this was maybe the biggest story in the history of all sports. a lot of people got interested in that story. the cycling organization who worked to protect him and that's one of the things -- we reveal the mechanics of that in the film, but tallas sponsors and even the media. everybody so wanted to protect this story he learned how to use that and use that very
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effectively. >> what's so attractive about sports is greatness. you gravitate toward it. you feel violated when this stuff happens. so the first thing i'm going to say, people want to give their opinions on the story because they're so passionate about it, and for me it was like the last straw of cynicism, and now i don't look at anything without questioning it. nothing. and as someone who he lied directly to you on the record, emotionally, what was that like for you? were you angry? were you -- i mean, what was your response? >> well, i was angry but in a weird way. i mean, look, lance armstrong's not the first person who lied to me. it's part of the brief. that's what i do for a living is get lied to. but the bigger thing for me because i realized i had become part of the promotional apparatus. i was part of the cover-up, and that's where i really got angry. >> he used you. >> he did. >> he used a lot of people. >> you weren't alone. >> he did use a lot of people. >> i wasn't alone.
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>> you talked to him after, obviously, he talks to you about it. >> i told him -- >> how is he now? how does he -- looking at this file video of him with all this money and excitement and chaos around him, up on stage and i think one of his wives or girlfriends crying as he's speaking. and all of it, all of it, all of it is a lie. >> well, i think that what's interesting about him is he still is just going forward. i think he wants to be considered a great athlete, and we can say that a lot of the cyclists around, the top cyclists were riding but he hasn't reckoned with the damage he's done with his lie. >> he destroyed cycling in some respects. right? to be fair, like you just said, alex, everybody is doping. every single person. >> all the top riders. >> so let's not take away from his greatness against all the dopers.
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but at the same time, you learn this lesson. it's the cover-up, not the act. >> the win at all costs attitude. that's the bigger thing here. sometimes we can admire it in athletes but when it spills outside the sport, it becomes a scary thing. >> what happens to him? >> good question. the big question everybody wants to know is can he come to grips with this? he's facing some pretty high legal challenges. >> any chance he goes to jail? >> no, i don't think so. not at this point. i think it's unlikely -- the federal government dropped its prosecution some people felt under political pressure. but i think the biggest thing that he's facing now is a lawsuit that could cost him over $100 million. >> all right then. the film is "the armstrong lie" and it's playing in theaters nationwide. alex gibney, amazing work. thank you so much. >> thank you. pleasure. >> the best of late night is next. [ male announcer ] this is jim,
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we have a big nuclear deal with iran. some kind of ayn greemt. they will give up their enrichment program and -- but something's not right at the white house. did you see the president? >> no. what do you mean? >> i think it's the wear and tear of the office. president obama is announcing the big nuclear agreement with iran. something is not right.
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>> okay. >> take a look at this, then we'll talk about it. >> the diplomacy opened up a new path. a future in which we can verify iran's -- >> he's got a giant cat there. >> a bad weekend for bears fans. they saw their playoff hopes anyoneish yesterday, lost to the rams, but that didn't stop two guys from having fun. joe and dan outside the emerald bar in isle, somebody challenged somebody to a race. a lot of talk about football players getting brain damage. we might need to worry about football fans too. >> yeah. there. >> ready, set, go. >> oh! really? >> [ bleep ]! [ bleep ]! >> he hurt himself. >> wait. why are those guys hugging? >> up next, what if anything did we learn today?
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barnicle? >> nothing. i started part-time, now i'm a manager.n. my employer matches my charitable giving. really. i get bonuses even working part-time. where i work, over 400 people are promoted every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. you get your coffee here. you get your hair cut here.
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cheryl burke is cha-cha-ing in depend silhouette briefs for charity, to prove that with soft fabric and waistband, the best protection looks, fits, and feels just like underwear. get a free sample and try for yourself. i don't want to say it. >> welcome back to "morning joe." what have you learned? >> i forgot he was so tall. >> i didn't expect to get called on first, teacher. >> sully. >> you're invited to the sully
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annual festivus dinner. airing of grievances. >> julie? >> i learned i have to go to detroit and get some sweet potato fries. >> been kl put on two different shoes today. >> i wasn't going to do it. and look at his socks. >> look at that. >> very sad. >> early in the morning. it happens. >> it's okay. my socks. >> that's not good. what did you learn, mike? >> a great night tonight. going to see van morrison. >> van the man tonight. you're going to the beacon. >> yes. >> fantastic. >> you'll love it. >> with his back to the audience. >> sometimes he doesn't catch it. >> i learned today dan gilbert is going to sponsor us when we do our show in detroit this spring. >> we need to talk to dan.
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>> i got him on set. he said yes twice. >> "morning joe" mortgaged by quicken loans. >> yes. mika, have fun at the beacon. >> i will. >> amazing theater. way too early, mike. what time is it? >> ordinarily, "morning joe." but right now -- is chuck there today? >> chuck is there. special guest star, this is amazing, raquel welch. >> mick jagger. with chuck todd. >> amazing. >> get your calendar ready. well, when push comes to shove a lot of closed-door discussions for finding a fiscal path forward, but could last week's rules revolt in the senate crush chances for a deal? we're going hear the latest from the top house democrat in the budget haggling, maryland's chris van hollen. and major potential headaches for the obama white house. a deep dive into the latest challe

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